My Japanese garden

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My house is built on the northwest hill of Rera. I’m building the Japanese garden into the north side of the hill. The passage to the garden lengthens to the north when I go down from the terrace of the hill to the low land facing the sea. It is unfinished here, and the pavement is not yet spread. And my Japanese garden already begins from here. I make my garden such as Roji.

Roji is the garden through which one passes to the tea rooms for the Japanese tea ceremony. It is a space for promote the mind to a tea party. In Roji, it is made into a curve form in the image of a mountain path having a long garden way, and stepping-stones leading a walker to the tea room are spread. The stepping-stone expresses a path of a mountain. Why did it have to be a mountain path?

It was merchants of the Middle Ages to have developed the tea party first in Japan. Because they lived in the city area, they were able to have only their garden of the limited area. Their firm faced a street. Therefore, their garden was made on the back of the firm like a courtyard. And the narrow ways from a street to a garden were established. It is a beginning of Roji.

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The roji is usually divided into an outer and inner garden. I sit down on the chair of the inner garden. They are usually separated by the plain gate. I used a bamboo fence in substitution for the gate. As for an inner garden, Yugen(subtly profound grace, not obvious) is emphasized than outer garden.

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Ostentatious plantings are generally avoided in preference for moss, ferns, and evergreens. However, my garden is not necessarily a garden for tea parties. Therefore, one camellia lets bloom.

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On the other hand, the contralateral garden of the Japanese-style room is the garden which is not limited.

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This garden takes time slowly and carefully and intends to build it up.

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