Chemistry Prize for “The magnificent art in test tube”

from dn.se

Chemistry Prize for “The magnificent art in test tube”

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Richard Heck, Ei-Ichi Nigishi and Akira Suzuki. The three have developed a clever method for producing complex molecules, which today is widely used by researchers and pharmaceutical manufacturers.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry honored American Richard Heck and Japanese Ei-Ichi Nigishi and Akira Suzuki. It was revealed just before lunch on Wednesday at a press conference at the Royal Academy Assembly Hall in Stockholm.

The three received the prize for “magnificent art in test tube”, as the Academy’s permanent secretary Staffan Normark put it in your presentation.The three received the prize for “magnificent art in test tube”, as the Academy’s permanent secretary Staffan Normark put it in your presentation.

The scientific motivation is “the palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings in organic synthesis”. Specifically: a smart tool for the manufacture of sophisticated chemicals.
 
This chemist tools, which the laureates developed independently in 1960 – and 1970’s, has made it possible to produce carbon-based molecules that are as complex as those you find in nature. The metal palladium are used as catalyst molecules in this way, cross-linked together to create new ones.
 
The method used by researchers worldwide, but can also inter alia be used to produce medicines. It is also used in the electronics industry. Sciences writes about so-called OLEDs, which consist of organic molecules that radiates light and used to produce super-thin displays. The palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is one of the keys in the process.
 
In organic chemistry, humans have managed to build on nature’s chemistry by using carbon’s ability to create stable and useful molecules. It has given humanity new drugs and revolutionized the material development, such as plastics, “says Academy of Sciences.
 
It Has given humanity new drugs and revolutionized the materials development, Such As plastics, “says Academy of Sciences. A growing number of unwanted residues occurred. The palladium-catalyzed method solved the problem.
 
Academy of Sciences finds that the need for complex chemicals is steadily increasing. The need for new drugs to treat cancer, for example, or slow the deadly virus. But even in agriculture can benefit from this technology to protect crops. Academy writes that this year’s Nobel Prize “has improved the chemists’ ability to meet all these aspirations”.
 
Heck and Nigishi operating in the U.S., the University of Delaware and Indiana, while Suzuki is based in Sapporo, Japan. Heck and Nigishi operating in the U.S., the University of Delaware and Indiana, the while Suzuki is based in Sapporo, Japan.
 
 
 
 
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One Response to Chemistry Prize for “The magnificent art in test tube”

  1. reza says:

    thanks for posting this

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